Which web dev language should be choosen for marketplace site?

LarsDine
LarsDine
Hey, starting here with a really beginner question: what is suitable web development language and where to start with it to build something like this: https://zoptamo.com ? It is a marketplace with standard scheme of functions for a site of this type. Any advices and help are appreciated.

Comments

  • envigo
    envigo
    Digital Marketing Services in UK United Kingdom / IndiaPosts: 15
    If you want an extremely scalable solution then use Ruby on Rails.
    Else for most reasons PHP should work. We still use PHP for most of the projects unless there is specific requirement by the client.
  • LarsDine
    LarsDine
    Oh, thanks for an advice, this will definitely be checked :D
  • calder12
    calder12
    Senior Member Posts: 13,300
    I'm not really sure why you mentioned RoR as scalable, considering its processes run consecutively instead of concurrently it makes it a non-trivial thing to make it extremely scalable.

    Too many people get caught in the "what happens if I get 10,000,000 users right away?"

    You won't, and by the time you do you'll have the money to invest in refactoring. The simplest (and cheapest) way to scale in the beginning is to throw hardware at the problem not code, and again by the time that becomes an issue you should be making enough money to be able to truly afford to refactor the code.

    Write applications in what you're comfortable writing, not what the latest flavour of the week is or what you think suits the final product. The learning curve when trying to complete a new product with a new language will far outweigh any long term benefits that language has. Get the product to market, worry about scalability later. The only time this doesn't hold true is if you already know the language that fits the final product best.
  • switchMode
    switchMode
    edited December 2016
    calder12 wrote: »
    I'm not really sure why you mentioned RoR as scalable, considering its processes run consecutively instead of concurrently it makes it a non-trivial thing to make it extremely scalable.
    Not entirely sure what you mean by that? Ruby runs continuously. Unlike, say, PHP. Not that there is anything wrong with either, it just doesn't have much to do with scalability ;)

    If you are referring to processes spawned per connection - there are a number of different servers available. With passenger I have one server that handled 100,000+ hits in a 24 hour period using *many* concurrent processes and it was fine. Should also note that was ecommerce so couldn't just chuck it behind a static cache - every page needs things like cart contents. PHP is fast so can do better than that, depending on your set up. You probably won't need to scale for a while.

    However, if you are starting out and have never done anything like this before either accept it will require years of experience to do it well or have a bank account that can handle hiring experts when (not if) you need them.
    calder12 wrote: »
    Write applications in what you're comfortable writing, not what the latest flavour of the week is or what you think suits the final product. The learning curve when trying to complete a new product with a new language will far outweigh any long term benefits that language has. Get the product to market, worry about scalability later. The only time this doesn't hold true is if you already know the language that fits the final product best.
    I'd amend this to write applications in a language that best fits inside the ven diagram of [popular | productive | fast]. You want popular because if you get stuck you want to either have a question someone else has had and already solved, or be able to find someone that can answer it. Productive because you want to get to market and fast (as possible) because slow code means expensive hardware or a lot of extra work.

    TLDR - PHP is fine.
  • calder12
    calder12
    Senior Member Posts: 13,300
    I think we both had the same final conclusion. It's just there's this trend towards people wanting to write a final product as an MVP and it doesn't (shouldn't) work that way. Like I said at the end of the day throwing hardware at traffic problems is the cheapest and easiest first solution.

    Spending months/years making a very performant product just to find out it isn't popular and dies is a waste of time and money. Trying to learn a new language to market test an idea is also a waste of time and money.

    So yeah, PHP is fine. So is JS if that's the language you know best, or Ruby or whatever, because when all is said and done if you're trying to create something "scalable" you're assuming it's going to be very popula.

    TLDR - it makes more sense to test the popularity before the scalability.
  • 9infotech
    9infotech
    9 Infotech Mohali, PunjabPosts: 15
    Ruby on Rails
  • Mentorshouse
    Mentorshouse
    edited January 12
    choosing the Right Programming Language for Your Startup

    If you ever want to be the center of controversy in a room packed with developers, declare that one programming language is better than another. Banners will be raised and battle cries will be heard from various fiefdoms pontificating:

    “Java is the greatest language ever and powers the Internet,” “Ruby on Rails is the fastest way to get to MVP,” “Python is more sophisticated,” “I only program in Scala, bask in the glory of my multi-paradigmed awesomeness,”

    And so on. But the fact is, as the technical cofounder of a startup company, one of the earliest questions you will need to answer will be: What is the best programming language for my startup? To answer that question at a high level you can concentrate on three aspects related to programming stacks: the Characteristics of the Language, your Local Ecosystem and the Problem Domain you are solving.
    Characteristics of the Language

    Many startup customers using Amazon Web Services (AWS) tell us the reason they choose AWS is because we are developer centric and offer a comprehensive set of software development kits (SDKs) for multiple popular programming languages including: .NET, Java and the JVM, Python, Ruby, PHP and Node.js. Although there are many different languages available within the programmers’ toolbox, let’s restrict the discussion to the languages just listed as developers creating cloud-based applications actively use them. Each language has different characteristics, communities, support, and ecosystems to consider when making your choice:
  • Abegail_Louise
    Abegail_Louise
    I am working in a technology integration company. Basically, Ruby works well in marketing.
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