Skills in 2017

Beartrap
Beartrap
ShadowplayPosts: 1,724 in General Discussion
I know this post has probably been done to death but I just wanted to talk about it again

Previous years.. worked as a front end Wordpress developer.

Nowadays.. having a hard time finding jobs. Not sure what to focus on. Swift Development, C#? UI dribbble type design?

What do you guys think?

Comments

  • Nick
    Nick
    Cream of DT Posts: 18,152
    What do you enjoy doing the most?

    Do that and do it well.
  • calder12
    calder12
    Senior Member Posts: 13,421
    Swift and C# are still things?

    Do what Nick said. There are almost always going to be jobs in every aspect of this industry if you're good at what you do. Enjoying it makes you not want to shoot yourself in the mornings.
  • handcraftedweb
    handcraftedweb
    thought leader Left coastPosts: 6,743
    calder12 wrote: »
    Swift and C# are still things?

    Swift is a fine modern language. Although more or less limited to Apple hardware, it's the language of choice for Apple hardware.

    My guess is that JavaScript will remain a valuable skill for years to come.
  • Kid.
    Kid.
    watching... Posts: 5,709
    Trying to learn Javascript myself but I've got so much work just now I'm finding it hard to look at a computer unless I'm getting paid for it. Not that I don't enjoy what I do, I'm just concerned I spend far too long looking at a screen and sitting on a chair. Not to discourage anyone learning new skills, I'm just trying to get a better work/life balance.
  • Limbo
    Limbo
    Established Norm Posts: 27,307
    UI dribbble type design?

    This isn't even a thing.
  • Klang
    Klang
    Ray fucking Purchase Posts: 17,252
    It is.
  • Giraffe
    Giraffe
    toxic designer Posts: 9,841
    Do likes on dribbble pay a salary?
  • calder12
    calder12
    Senior Member Posts: 13,421
    Javascript is worth it (do not read that as jQuery). There is so much happening in that space now, but trust me from someone that's been down the road of having to learn frameworks first, focus on the base language.

    It's like anything else. If you understand the basics, the frameworks are easy to pick up. And that includes jQuery. How many sites have you guys seen with a dozen jQuery plugins to do simple shit? I know I've seen a lot. It also means when something goes wrong you can actually fix it.

    But I'm going to reiterate what I said earlier (after Nick said it). Find something you like and get good at it.

    PHP gets shit on a lot these days, but there are PHP devs that make a great living because they're good at it and PHP isn't going anywhere anytime soon. I decided when I started freelancing that I was going to focus primarily on PHP. Because it's my strongest language and I actually like writing it. The better I get at it the better my bottom line since there is still a ton of work to be had in that space.
  • Giraffe
    Giraffe
    toxic designer Posts: 9,841
    As someone who has somehow remained mostly on the print side of things (and happy about it), it's always interesting seeing these fluctuations in demand.
  • Dusty
    Dusty
    You Ecks Posts: 11,545
    All our devs work in C# and React. Horses for courses.
  • Beartrap
    Beartrap
    Shadowplay Posts: 1,724 edited November 2016
    I appreciate the replies, but its hard to look past some of the more annoying replies.

    "Do Dribbble likes pay salaries?"

    I literally just saw a job offering where the company said "the perfect candidate may be active on communities such as Dribbble, maybe they have a large follower count on there"

    Some of the other answers that are less specific, like "find what you love and do that" I get what you're saying, but I really was asking if anyone has seen specific skills becoming more in-demand in recent months from hiring agencies. Like Invision or Flinto - actual names of platforms I can look into. There are so many learning resources online, such as Udacity, so it's hard to pick a path. That's why I posted here. I didn't get much of an answer. I've listened to a few new issues of podcast I follow that have been immensely more helpful than this thread.

    But, I never really post here anyway, so I can't get mad for people not being helpful when the only time I come here is to ask for help on something anyway.
  • switchMode
    switchMode
    Perhaps the vague replies are due to the vague question? C# and Dribbble are two very different things - and we don't know which one is going to be best for you or the market you are in.

    You likely can get a job pretty easily by scanning some job ads, doing a self driven project or two using a handful of the core buzzwords (React, Webpack, Yarn, Node, whatever) and nailing an interview.

    I would say focus less on which platform you use and more on the underlying skillset. But in today's landscape you can probably do that after you land the job.
  • StisterMeve
    StisterMeve
    Fucky-do Posts: 6,595
    Trump is president elect.

    Vital skills in 2017 with be foraging, hunting, gathering, bunker refurb. Tweeting.
  • Giraffe
    Giraffe
    toxic designer Posts: 9,841
    Beartrap wrote: »
    I appreciate the replies, but its hard to look past some of the more annoying replies.

    "Do Dribbble likes pay salaries?"

    I literally just saw a job offering where the company said "the perfect candidate may be active on communities such as Dribbble, maybe they have a large follower count on there"

    Some of the other answers that are less specific, like "find what you love and do that" I get what you're saying, but I really was asking if anyone has seen specific skills becoming more in-demand in recent months from hiring agencies. Like Invision or Flinto - actual names of platforms I can look into. There are so many learning resources online, such as Udacity, so it's hard to pick a path. That's why I posted here. I didn't get much of an answer. I've listened to a few new issues of podcast I follow that have been immensely more helpful than this thread.

    But, I never really post here anyway, so I can't get mad for people not being helpful when the only time I come here is to ask for help on something anyway.

    Flinto is a specific app, but it still very much falls into the skill category of "Prototyping designs." The skills in 2017 that are worth your time are the skills that will likely carry you ten years into the future or whenever it is you're flat out replaced by a robot. Not whatever bullshit du jor is marketed with source sans pro and set against a stocksy image.

    And yeah, you have a history of posting shit here and then ignoring the sound advice of the members. Like in this very thread, when Calder gave you an in-depth answer and you fucking whinged about not being helped.
  • Beartrap
    Beartrap
    Shadowplay Posts: 1,724
    Trump is president elect.

    Vital skills in 2017 with be foraging, hunting, gathering, bunker refurb. Tweeting.

    hah true
  • David
    David
    Keeping Tom Happy Posts: 12,931
    - What should I learn
    - That depends, what would you like to do?
    - That is not helpful, I asked what to learn! people are very unhelpful

    I'd start here;
    http://web.utk.edu/~nolt/courses/logic.html
  • Dusty
    Dusty
    You Ecks Posts: 11,545
    I literally just saw a job offering where the company said "the perfect candidate may be active on communities such as Dribbble, maybe they have a large follower count on there"

    Sounds like a shit job. If you feel confident enough to learn anything then you should follow Calder's advice and learn vanilla JS. no fancy libraries, just good old-school JS. The knowledge this gives you will be relevant to any framework and serve you for years to come.
  • bytomlove
    bytomlove
    I think anyone who focuses on such short term fixes such as 'software skills' is always going to struggle to find jobs.

    What will happen in 5/10 years time when everything you've learnt becomes redundant?
    To base your career around a certain piece of software, language or whatever is the next thing Apple promotes is just career suicide.

    The skills you should be focusing on is having a deep understanding of design as a whole; problem solving, strategic thinking, creative leadership, business management, public speaking, team building.

    Those are the kind of skills that you will need time and again over your career. That is unless you want to be a Mac Monkey, sat at your desk for the next 20 years, earning the same living you are now and probably re-posting your question each year, in the hope some someone says something to you that you deem worthwhile.

    I think the rise of digital has seen far too many people focus on the latest shiny tech, than what truly drives creativity.
  • desiramba
    desiramba
    Tamil Girls Mobile Numbers Posts: 2
    Just join freelancer sites online
  • handcraftedweb
    handcraftedweb
    thought leader Left coastPosts: 6,743
    bytomlove wrote: »
    What will happen in 5/10 years time when everything you've learnt becomes redundant?

    This is an unfortunate fact of life for those that use tech tools: you must invest an inordinate amount of time in the tools themselves, and that investment might have a limited ROI.

    We all agree there are fundamentals, principles and skills not tied to a specific technology that have a longer lasting benefit, but the technological choices are important too. To oversimplify: investing in learning PS will have more ROI than learning MS Paint (I think).
  • calder12
    calder12
    Senior Member Posts: 13,421
    This would be why I said learn the fundamentals.

    Want to learn React, Ember, Backbone, jQuery, Angular etc etc? Learn vanilla Javascript first.
    Want to learn Laravel, Codeigniter, etc? Learn PHP first.
    Want to learn Rails, learn Ruby first.

    If you understand the basics, you are going to pick up the ever changing frameworks a lot quicker. If you focus on frameworks and never actually understand the basics you're going to be constantly trying to figure out new shit and not really understanding why it can do what it does, and worse when it fucks up you'll have zero clue how to fix it.
  • Giraffe
    Giraffe
    toxic designer Posts: 9,841
    He's fucked off back to his podcast, I think.
  • switchMode
    switchMode
    @calder12 I think javascript was an exception, back in the day at least. Using vanilla javascript was exposing yourself to all the craziness that came with it, jQuery had relatively sane functionality and I still prefer using $() style selector syntax over native. Laravel syntax also arguably confuses anyone used to straight php due to the facade system. Fucked with IDE's doing automatic lookups etc too iirc.

    I tend to learn both a language and a framework at the same time when trying something new. Learning elixir and phoenix right now. Reading other peoples code (libraries etc) teaches both the language and the frameworks ideology at once. Learning just a language by itself is often only feasible if you are making very small projects or toys, or have a lot of time to burn doing one thing at a time.
  • calder12
    calder12
    Senior Member Posts: 13,421
    Yeah I see that point, and I completely agree I'll take jQuery over vanilla javascript if for no other reason than the cleaner syntax and not reinventing the wheel to do basic things. But for the frameworks I still feel a good understanding of the base language is important. You're in a bit of a different class because you're a bit of a step above the average in that you have a solid understanding of programming in general.

    You know as well as I do, just from seeing SO if nothing else, the number of people that ask really simple questions because they just don't have a solid knowledge of the underlying language of a framework they're trying to use.

    Laravel does a lot of magic behind the scenes, and that example kind of proves my point a bit. If you understand PHP you can understand the magic just by digging into the core, if you don't then when something doesn't work you're never going to figure it out.

    All that being said, I do agree with you, I worded what I said badly. Learning JS and React at the same time is fine, I suppose my point was don't focus solely on trying to figure out React while not paying attention to the JS part at all.

    PS. I have a friend that is constantly learning new languages, he did Phoenix and Elixir last year, and Haskell and a bunch of other stuff... jealous as hell of his abilities lol
  • Threeboy
    Threeboy
    Make sh*t everyday CanadaPosts: 50
    Kid. wrote: »
    Trying to learn Javascript myself but I've got so much work just now I'm finding it hard to look at a computer unless I'm getting paid for it. Not that I don't enjoy what I do, I'm just concerned I spend far too long looking at a screen and sitting on a chair. Not to discourage anyone learning new skills, I'm just trying to get a better work/life balance.

    I picked away at the 10 hour course on Codecademy - while I won't be landing any dev jobs it was nice to finally get a comprehensive overview of something I've seen and worked with for like 15 years.
  • shina
    shina
    Sounds like a random question, I think it all depends on the area you'd like to focus on e.g. dev or design.
  • jannatul18
    jannatul18
    Registered User Posts: 92
    Nick wrote: »
    What do you enjoy doing the most?

    Do that and do it well.
    I agree.
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