What to do with slow clients

brianemwd
brianemwd
Registered UserPosts: 1 in Business
Hi All:

I am new to this community but not new to web design. However I do have a perplexing business issue that I am not sure what to do with.

Most of my design projects are given a completion time frame of 30 days and I require 50% down payment of the project cost up front. The remainder is due upon the completion of the project.

Lately what has been happening is that I am running into clients who are not giving me all of the information that I need to complete their projects and so they put me and their project on hold because of it. So now I have a number of incomplete projects in limbo due to client delays and I have only received half of the cost of the project.

How do other designers handle these situations? Do I just close the project and give up on losing half of the cost of the project? I don't like keeping things open indefinitely and I certainly don't like not receiving the other half of the project cost due to the client deciding on not putting priority on the project AFTER I have started it.

I would appreciate some suggestions.

Thanks,
Brian

Comments

  • moz
    moz
    The 1970sPosts: 6,590
    I have terms which state an inactivity period (usually 30 days) where, if a project has stalled, I invoice for any outstanding work-to-date (obviously I get a % deposit on commencement).

    That usually shunts the client into getting the project back on the go, otherwise I've been paid for what I've done and I can carry on with other projects.
  • bennyboy
    bennyboy
    Ah yo Boogie Down B-TownPosts: 3,779
    We usually just send an invoice, explaining politely that if they pay the invoice for work done, they can pick it back up when they are ready.

    They usually pay up, or get the project going again.
  • roto
    roto
    |-/ Posts: 12,958
    Cattle prods don't work?
  • david100
    david100
    Registered User Posts: 1
    I think you can request to pay you but if they do not respond then you can do nothing with them.
  • 3magine
    3magine
    Registered User Posts: 7
    There are a few ways you can protect yourself from client delays, but at the end of the day, if someone disappears, there isn't much you can, unless a client completely abandons the project.

    - Structure your payments against milestones (ex. 25% deposit, 25% upon design approval, 25% development progress, and 25% before final delivery) This will allow you to collect in smaller increments, however, if a project stalls, you won't be out half of the project cost.
    - Put a time clause in your contract stating that if a project stagnates for X amount of days you have the right to invoice for all completed work to date.
  • Johnpet
    Johnpet
    Lots of customers are sluggish, and if you are searching for a means to 'repair' that you'll be let down.

    It's far better to simply minimize your direct exposure to that threat. You could write progression billing to clients who stall, and also compose right into your contract that you could not maintain schedules for customers that are late on deliverables. Then, you can work with various other clients/jobs when a job stalls.

    There is no much better means to manage slow/late customers than to merely not care excessive concerning it. If you have other clients/projects to work with and you earn money for the job that you have completed, who truly cares if a job takes for life?
  • steveb
    steveb
    BitterHusk Original™ Järvenpää FinlandPosts: 24,076
    Is anyone reading this shit? Lack of reaction to that last post suggests not.
  • roto
    roto
    |-/ Posts: 12,958 edited June 2016
    @steveb, JuanPet is a bit of a joke ICYMI. He's habitually revived old threads like this & copied and pasted prominent blog entries in an attempt to pass them off as his own thoughts. Take notice, the post before his above is from 2013.

    I'm surprised you haven't hit him with a swift ban stick. Unless, of course, you merely not care excessive concerning it.
  • steveb
    steveb
    BitterHusk Original™ Järvenpää FinlandPosts: 24,076
    Yeah, I ban him at 9 in the morning and at 10 he's been unbanned and I have a mailbox full of complaints about being a fascist racist non-vegan misogynist. It's so degrading.
  • roto
    roto
    |-/ Posts: 12,958
    You gave it your best shot.
  • bennyboy
    bennyboy
    Ah yo Boogie Down B-TownPosts: 3,779
    You're non-vegan now? Unbelievable *drafts hate mail*
  • steveb
    steveb
    BitterHusk Original™ Järvenpää FinlandPosts: 24,076
    You do make me larf.
  • Oneplusone_Atelier
    Oneplusone_Atelier
    Brand(ed) Posts: 3
    I encounter this issue very often. I think you should remind via email or a phonecall to the client about the ongoing project. If the client still sound relunctant, then I think you should focus on your other projects on hand. Move on with clients like this.
  • steveb
    steveb
    BitterHusk Original™ Järvenpää FinlandPosts: 24,076 edited July 2016
    with clients like this, or from clients like this. One makes sense, the other doesn't. Which do you mean?

    Maybe it's not so easy to move on when the customer owes you £4000, however reluctant he may be.
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